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The Ultimate Guide to a Fabulous Pregnancy
An amazing, healthy pregnancy means a good birth and a healthy baby
and that's a beautiful thing.
17 aout 2018
You're Pregnant!
if you ask any woman who has yet to have a baby what she knows about childbirth you are probably going to hear things like
it hurts you need drugs
17 aout 2018
The Ultimate Guide to a Fabulous Pregnancy
An amazing, healthy pregnancy means a good birth and a healthy baby
and that's a beautiful thing.
17 aout 2018
The Ultimate Guide to a Fabulous Pregnancy
An amazing, healthy pregnancy means a good birth and a healthy baby
and that's a beautiful thing.
17 aout 2018

dimanche 21 octobre 2018

Getting pregnant isn't easy. Young people should at least be taught ..

Pregnancy Ladies
The first sign that a woman may be pregnant is that she fails to have a menstrual period when one is normally due. At about the same time as the period is missed, the woman may feel unwell, unduly tired, and her breasts may become swollen and uncomfortable.
A pregnant woman should not smoke because smoking adversely affects the baby's growth, and smaller babies have more problems in the early months of life. The chemicals inhaled from cigarette smoke are absorbed into the bloodstream and pass through the placenta into the baby's bloodstream, so that when the mother has a smoke, so does the baby.
Alcohol should be avoided especially during the first three months of pregnancy when the vital organs of the foetus are developing. Later in pregnancy it is advisable to have no more than one drink every day with a meal.
Early in the pregnancy the breasts start to prepare for the task of feeding the baby, and one of the first things the woman notices is enlarged tender breasts and a tingling in the nipples. With a first pregnancy, the skin around the nipple (the areola) will darken, and the small lubricating glands may become more prominent to create small bumps. This darkening may also occur with the oral contraceptive pill.


Hormonal changes cause the woman to urinate more frequently. This settles down after about three months, but later in pregnancy the size of the uterus puts pressure on the bladder, and frequent urination again occurs.
Some women develop dark patches on the forehead and cheeks called chloasma, which are caused by
hormonal changes affecting the pigment cells in the skin. This can also be a side effect of the contraceptive pill.
The navel and a line down the centre of the woman's belly may also darken. These pigment changes fade somewhat after the pregnancy but will always remain darker than before.
After the pregnancy has been diagnosed, the woman should see her doctor at about ten weeks of pregnancy for the first antenatal check-up and referral to an obstetrician. At this check-up she is given a thorough examination (including an internal one), and blood and urine tests will be ordered to exclude any medical problems and to give
the doctor a baseline for later comparison. Routine antenatal checks are then performed by the midwife, general practitioner or obstetrician at monthly intervals until about 34 weeks pregnant, when the frequency will increase to fortnightly or weekly. Blood pressure
and weight measurement and a quick physical check are normally performed. A small ultrasound instrument may be used to listen for the baby's heart from quite an early stage. Further blood tests will be performed once or twice during this period, and a simple test will be carried out on a urine sample at every visit. An ultrasound scan is usually performed to check on the size and development of the foetus. Most women are advised to take tablets containing iron and folic acid throughout pregnancy and breastfeeding, in order to prevent both the mild anaemia that often accompanies pregnancy, and nerve developmental
abnormalities in the foetus.
As the skin of the belly stretches to accommodate the growing baby, and in other areas where fat may be found in the skin (such as breasts and buttocks), stretch marks in the form of reddish/purple streaks may develop. These will fade to a white/silver colour after the baby is born, but unfortunately they will not normally disappear completely.
About the fourth or fifth month, the thickening waistline will turn into a bulge, and by the sixth month, the swollen belly is unmistakable. The increased bulk will change the woman's sense of balance, and this can cause muscles to become fatigued unless she can make a conscious effort to maintain a good upright posture. Care of the back is vitally important in later pregnancy, as the ligaments become slightly softer and slacker with the hormonal changes, and movement between the vertebrae in the back can lead to severe and disabling pain if a nerve is pinched.
During pregnancy, the mother must supply all the food and oxygen for the developing baby and eliminate its waste materials. Because of these demands, the mother's metabolism changes, and increasing demands are made on several organs. In particular, the heart has to pump harder, and the lungs have more work to do supplying the needs of the enlarged uterus and the placenta. Circulation to the breasts, kidneys, skin and even gums also increases. Towards the end of the pregnancy, the mother's heart is working 40% harder than normal. The lungs must keep the increased blood circulation adequately supplied with oxygen.
As the mother is the baby's sole source of nourishment during pregnancy, she should pay attention to her diet. A balanced and varied diet containing plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as dairy products (calcium is required for the bones of both mother and baby), meat and cereals, is appropriate.
During the last three months of the pregnancy, antenatal classes are very beneficial. Women are taught exercises to strengthen the back and abdominal muscles, breathing exercises to help with the various stages of labour, and strategies to cope with them. Women who attend these classes generally do far better in labour than those who do not. In the month or so before delivery, it will be difficult for the mother to get comfortable in any position, sleeplessness will be common, and the pressure of the baby's head will make passing urine a far too regular event. Aches and pains will develop in unusual areas as muscles that are not normally used are called into play to support the extra weight, normally between 7 and 12 kg (baby + fluid + placenta + enlarged uterus + enlarged breasts), that the mother is carrying around. Attending lectures run by the Nursing Mothers' Association (or similar organisations) to learn about breastfeeding, how to prepare for it and how to avoid problems, is useful in the last few weeks of pregnancy and for a time after the baby is born. Visiting the hospital or birthing centre that you have booked into for the confinement can be helpful, so that the facilities and the labour ward will not appear cold and impersonal when they are used. After the baby is born, visits to a physiotherapist to get the tone back into your abdominal muscles and to strengthen the stretched muscles around the uterus and pelvis will help the woman regain her former figure.
The first sign that a woman may be pregnant is that she fails to have a menstrual period when one is normally due. At about the same time as the period is missed, the woman may feel unwell, unduly tired, and her breasts may become swollen and uncomfortable.
A pregnant woman should not smoke because smoking adversely affects the baby's growth, and smaller babies have more problems in the early months of life. The chemicals inhaled from cigarette smoke are absorbed into the bloodstream and pass through the placenta into the baby's bloodstream, so that when the mother has a smoke, so does the baby.
Alcohol should be avoided especially during the first three months of pregnancy when the vital organs of the foetus are developing. Later in pregnancy it is advisable to have no more than one drink every day with a meal.
Early in the pregnancy the breasts start to prepare for the task of feeding the baby, and one of the first things the woman notices is enlarged tender breasts and a tingling in the nipples. With a first pregnancy, the skin around the nipple (the areola) will darken, and the small lubricating glands may become more prominent to create small bumps. This darkening may also occur with the oral contraceptive pill.


Hormonal changes cause the woman to urinate more frequently. This settles down after about three months, but later in pregnancy the size of the uterus puts pressure on the bladder, and frequent urination again occurs.
Some women develop dark patches on the forehead and cheeks called chloasma, which are caused by
hormonal changes affecting the pigment cells in the skin. This can also be a side effect of the contraceptive pill.
The navel and a line down the centre of the woman's belly may also darken. These pigment changes fade somewhat after the pregnancy but will always remain darker than before.
After the pregnancy has been diagnosed, the woman should see her doctor at about ten weeks of pregnancy for the first antenatal check-up and referral to an obstetrician. At this check-up she is given a thorough examination (including an internal one), and blood and urine tests will be ordered to exclude any medical problems and to give
the doctor a baseline for later comparison. Routine antenatal checks are then performed by the midwife, general practitioner or obstetrician at monthly intervals until about 34 weeks pregnant, when the frequency will increase to fortnightly or weekly. Blood pressure
and weight measurement and a quick physical check are normally performed. A small ultrasound instrument may be used to listen for the baby's heart from quite an early stage. Further blood tests will be performed once or twice during this period, and a simple test will be carried out on a urine sample at every visit. An ultrasound scan is usually performed to check on the size and development of the foetus. Most women are advised to take tablets containing iron and folic acid throughout pregnancy and breastfeeding, in order to prevent both the mild anaemia that often accompanies pregnancy, and nerve developmental
abnormalities in the foetus.
As the skin of the belly stretches to accommodate the growing baby, and in other areas where fat may be found in the skin (such as breasts and buttocks), stretch marks in the form of reddish/purple streaks may develop. These will fade to a white/silver colour after the baby is born, but unfortunately they will not normally disappear completely.
About the fourth or fifth month, the thickening waistline will turn into a bulge, and by the sixth month, the swollen belly is unmistakable. The increased bulk will change the woman's sense of balance, and this can cause muscles to become fatigued unless she can make a conscious effort to maintain a good upright posture. Care of the back is vitally important in later pregnancy, as the ligaments become slightly softer and slacker with the hormonal changes, and movement between the vertebrae in the back can lead to severe and disabling pain if a nerve is pinched.
During pregnancy, the mother must supply all the food and oxygen for the developing baby and eliminate its waste materials. Because of these demands, the mother's metabolism changes, and increasing demands are made on several organs. In particular, the heart has to pump harder, and the lungs have more work to do supplying the needs of the enlarged uterus and the placenta. Circulation to the breasts, kidneys, skin and even gums also increases. Towards the end of the pregnancy, the mother's heart is working 40% harder than normal. The lungs must keep the increased blood circulation adequately supplied with oxygen.
As the mother is the baby's sole source of nourishment during pregnancy, she should pay attention to her diet. A balanced and varied diet containing plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as dairy products (calcium is required for the bones of both mother and baby), meat and cereals, is appropriate.
During the last three months of the pregnancy, antenatal classes are very beneficial. Women are taught exercises to strengthen the back and abdominal muscles, breathing exercises to help with the various stages of labour, and strategies to cope with them. Women who attend these classes generally do far better in labour than those who do not. In the month or so before delivery, it will be difficult for the mother to get comfortable in any position, sleeplessness will be common, and the pressure of the baby's head will make passing urine a far too regular event. Aches and pains will develop in unusual areas as muscles that are not normally used are called into play to support the extra weight, normally between 7 and 12 kg (baby + fluid + placenta + enlarged uterus + enlarged breasts), that the mother is carrying around. Attending lectures run by the Nursing Mothers' Association (or similar organisations) to learn about breastfeeding, how to prepare for it and how to avoid problems, is useful in the last few weeks of pregnancy and for a time after the baby is born. Visiting the hospital or birthing centre that you have booked into for the confinement can be helpful, so that the facilities and the labour ward will not appear cold and impersonal when they are used. After the baby is born, visits to a physiotherapist to get the tone back into your abdominal muscles and to strengthen the stretched muscles around the uterus and pelvis will help the woman regain her former figure.
The first sign that a woman may be pregnant is that she fails to have a menstrual period when one is normally due. At about the same time as the period is missed, the woman may feel unwell, unduly tired, and her breasts may become swollen and uncomfortable.
A pregnant woman should not smoke because smoking adversely affects the baby's growth, and smaller babies have more problems in the early months of life. The chemicals inhaled from cigarette smoke are absorbed into the bloodstream and pass through the placenta into the baby's bloodstream, so that when the mother has a smoke, so does the baby.
Alcohol should be avoided especially during the first three months of pregnancy when the vital organs of the foetus are developing. Later in pregnancy it is advisable to have no more than one drink every day with a meal.
Early in the pregnancy the breasts start to prepare for the task of feeding the baby, and one of the first things the woman notices is enlarged tender breasts and a tingling in the nipples. With a first pregnancy, the skin around the nipple (the areola) will darken, and the small lubricating glands may become more prominent to create small bumps. This darkening may also occur with the oral contraceptive pill.


Hormonal changes cause the woman to urinate more frequently. This settles down after about three months, but later in pregnancy the size of the uterus puts pressure on the bladder, and frequent urination again occurs.
Some women develop dark patches on the forehead and cheeks called chloasma, which are caused by
hormonal changes affecting the pigment cells in the skin. This can also be a side effect of the contraceptive pill.
The navel and a line down the centre of the woman's belly may also darken. These pigment changes fade somewhat after the pregnancy but will always remain darker than before.
After the pregnancy has been diagnosed, the woman should see her doctor at about ten weeks of pregnancy for the first antenatal check-up and referral to an obstetrician. At this check-up she is given a thorough examination (including an internal one), and blood and urine tests will be ordered to exclude any medical problems and to give
the doctor a baseline for later comparison. Routine antenatal checks are then performed by the midwife, general practitioner or obstetrician at monthly intervals until about 34 weeks pregnant, when the frequency will increase to fortnightly or weekly. Blood pressure
and weight measurement and a quick physical check are normally performed. A small ultrasound instrument may be used to listen for the baby's heart from quite an early stage. Further blood tests will be performed once or twice during this period, and a simple test will be carried out on a urine sample at every visit. An ultrasound scan is usually performed to check on the size and development of the foetus. Most women are advised to take tablets containing iron and folic acid throughout pregnancy and breastfeeding, in order to prevent both the mild anaemia that often accompanies pregnancy, and nerve developmental
abnormalities in the foetus.
As the skin of the belly stretches to accommodate the growing baby, and in other areas where fat may be found in the skin (such as breasts and buttocks), stretch marks in the form of reddish/purple streaks may develop. These will fade to a white/silver colour after the baby is born, but unfortunately they will not normally disappear completely.
About the fourth or fifth month, the thickening waistline will turn into a bulge, and by the sixth month, the swollen belly is unmistakable. The increased bulk will change the woman's sense of balance, and this can cause muscles to become fatigued unless she can make a conscious effort to maintain a good upright posture. Care of the back is vitally important in later pregnancy, as the ligaments become slightly softer and slacker with the hormonal changes, and movement between the vertebrae in the back can lead to severe and disabling pain if a nerve is pinched.
During pregnancy, the mother must supply all the food and oxygen for the developing baby and eliminate its waste materials. Because of these demands, the mother's metabolism changes, and increasing demands are made on several organs. In particular, the heart has to pump harder, and the lungs have more work to do supplying the needs of the enlarged uterus and the placenta. Circulation to the breasts, kidneys, skin and even gums also increases. Towards the end of the pregnancy, the mother's heart is working 40% harder than normal. The lungs must keep the increased blood circulation adequately supplied with oxygen.
As the mother is the baby's sole source of nourishment during pregnancy, she should pay attention to her diet. A balanced and varied diet containing plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as dairy products (calcium is required for the bones of both mother and baby), meat and cereals, is appropriate.
During the last three months of the pregnancy, antenatal classes are very beneficial. Women are taught exercises to strengthen the back and abdominal muscles, breathing exercises to help with the various stages of labour, and strategies to cope with them. Women who attend these classes generally do far better in labour than those who do not. In the month or so before delivery, it will be difficult for the mother to get comfortable in any position, sleeplessness will be common, and the pressure of the baby's head will make passing urine a far too regular event. Aches and pains will develop in unusual areas as muscles that are not normally used are called into play to support the extra weight, normally between 7 and 12 kg (baby + fluid + placenta + enlarged uterus + enlarged breasts), that the mother is carrying around. Attending lectures run by the Nursing Mothers' Association (or similar organisations) to learn about breastfeeding, how to prepare for it and how to avoid problems, is useful in the last few weeks of pregnancy and for a time after the baby is born. Visiting the hospital or birthing centre that you have booked into for the confinement can be helpful, so that the facilities and the labour ward will not appear cold and impersonal when they are used. After the baby is born, visits to a physiotherapist to get the tone back into your abdominal muscles and to strengthen the stretched muscles around the uterus and pelvis will help the woman regain her former figure.

You're pregnant: Now what?

Pregnancy Ladies


if you ask any woman who has yet to have a baby what she knows about childbirth you are probably going to hear things like; 
it happens in a hospital
it hurts
you need drugs,
injections, 
doctors, nurses
it can go on for days
it’s dangerous… you can DIE!!

Where do we get this from? When you stop and think about it… we never really get properly educated about childbirth. And yet, it has the potential to affect half of the global population. Instead of there being a conscious effort to educate women about childbirth, we are left to our own devices to absorb whatever happens to be passing in the wind. And this usually means that our main sources of information are places like:

TV shows & movies They want DRAMA!!!!!
A hospital scene with loads of doctors and nurses in white coats and masks fiddling with beeping machines is just that – DRAMA! Filming a mum quietly giving birth at home by candle light with her husband holding her hand, and a midwife knitting in the corner is not exactly dramatic material. And yet, that was pretty much what one of my births was like. The other one wasn’t that dissimilarexcept the midwife wasn’t knitting.

School We’ve all been there girls! Sat at school being made to watch THE VIDEO. You know, that hugely dramatic childbirth one… the one with the screaming woman, blood everywhere, hospital scene the one that was etched into your brain that put you off kids for life.. yeah.. that one! Now I can ‘t help wondering whether the objective for schools “educating” teenage girls about childbirth, is probably going to have prevent teenage pregnancies higher on the list than educate/demonstrate how childbirth CAN BE. Well, it worked for me anyhow… the idea of kids pushed firmly to the back on my to-do list.


Friends & Family We might be lucky and hear positive tales, but generally we’ll probably only hear to the horror stories… the positive stories don’t seem to surface. In fact, I’m speaking to a lot of mums right now who have had positive birth stories and one thing keeps coming up; they don’t often get to share their story. It seems that when it transpires that they had a great birth, that other women are not interested in hearing their story. Or if they do get a chance to start sharing, they aren’t well received so they keep it brief and then decide not to share next time, or they play it down. Some have even been cut-down while sharing their stories, while others are accused of gloating. Like, seriously! And all this FROM OTHER WOMEN! And so all we’re left with are tales of pain, trauma, drama and “NEVER AGAIN!”… how tragic.
Where does all this lead us to believe (WRONGLY!) about childbirth? Well, the short answer is this: we’re being drip fed a ton of lies about childbirth! Of course, it’s not an intentional thing, it’s just where we find ourselves. Through the various sources of information that we are typically exposed to that help inform us on childbirth, it can be fairly safe to say that the overall picture is not a pretty one. There are some consistent lies about childbirth that we’re being fed and they are coming right up…

The 3 lies about childbirth that won’t go away

Lie #1: Labour and childbirth WILL be painful This seems to be a given, and non negotiable fact. WRONG! There are many women who give birth and don’t find it painful.. Just search this blog for positive birth stories to find other women’s accounts of their positive pain-free births if you like (I’ll be adding more to this as time goes on). There are many cultures where pain isn’t automatically assumed to accompany childbirth, it’s mainly a western thing. And let’s not forget, animals aren’t in pain when they give birth either and that’s because they’re not full of fear, as we are BECAUSE OF THESE LIES ABOUT CHILDBIRTH!

Lie #2: Childbirth is a medical situation This is why most babies are only born in hospitals, right? WRONG! Pregnant women are not ill. They are not suffering from a medical condition that requires medical attention. Unless they are suffering from a medical condition that would still require medical supervision were they not pregnant.

Lie #3: Childbirth requires medical assistance Childbirth needs an army of nurses and doctors to be present as well as some scary-looking medical machines and instruments. And the woman giving birth is going to need a whole host of medical aids – drugs, artificial oxytocin, epidural injections, forceps etc because she just can’t do it on her own. AGAIN – WRONG! Women are perfectly capable of giving birth unassisted by these artificial and medical interventions. If there’s any help and support the woman needs, it’s emotional support to help her feel safe, secure and loved… it’s this that keeps labour progressing naturally at a pace that she and baby can handle. The minute we mess with that, we disrupt nature’s ability to just get on with it and do what it knows so well. What is so sad about all of this is that as women we are conditioned since our school days that childbirth is not something we can do on our own, but that we need help with it. Medical help. On the one hand, our biology lessons taught us that women are built to conceive and give birth to ensure the survival of our race. And yet, popular culture bombards us with messages that lead us to believe that actually, we’re not really capable of doing what our bodies were built to do. In fact, we’re just not good enough. We’re failures! But there’s a double whammy here. The more we are led to believe that childbirth requires medical assistance, theless likely we are to believe that it’s a natural process that can happen perfectly adequately on its own. Now of course, there are still risks, as with most things in life and sure, childbirth carries with it some risks. Risks that are increased if the health of the mother is compromised, or if she doesn’t have access to adequate healthcare. So in developing countries, childbirth brings with it a more increased risk to life than it does for those of us living in developed countries. But driving a car is risky, and so is walking
on a pavement.. and yet we are not constantly being bombarded with stories of car accidents and pedestrians being hit by drunk drivers or out of control vehicles. So let’s set the record straight here. Let’s bust these lies about childbirth once and for all!

 Childbirth truths to be embraced Let’s embrace these truths instead:

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "happy pregnancy"Truth #1: Childbirth doesn’t have to hurt… In fact if you surrender to the process and let nature do her thing it won’t. but that means letting go.. so those of you with control issues might find that a tad tricky! 
Truth #2: Childbirth is not an illness or a medical condition… It does not require doctors or a hospital. It only becomes a medical condition once mum’s health is compromised. But for the most part, it’s a natural process that happens much more safely and with better outcomes at home. 
Truth #3: Childbirth does not require medical assistance… You do not NEED drugs or injections. If you get to that point in labour then it’s more likely to be because you were induced. Induction often leads to a cascade cascade of interventions which might well include an emergency c-section. If you create the space to allow nature to be in control and to set the pace then no medical interventions should be required. Unless of course complications arise, and then, yes is hands off – let the medical teams DO THEIR THING! So, if you’re a parent-to-be, be aware of these lies about childbirth and make sure you get savvy about it so that you are well informed. Don’t rely on your mates or the movies for your education, because it could mean the difference between a positive and negative birth experience and it’s just not worth it.


if you ask any woman who has yet to have a baby what she knows about childbirth you are probably going to hear things like; 
it happens in a hospital
it hurts
you need drugs,
injections, 
doctors, nurses
it can go on for days
it’s dangerous… you can DIE!!

Where do we get this from? When you stop and think about it… we never really get properly educated about childbirth. And yet, it has the potential to affect half of the global population. Instead of there being a conscious effort to educate women about childbirth, we are left to our own devices to absorb whatever happens to be passing in the wind. And this usually means that our main sources of information are places like:

TV shows & movies They want DRAMA!!!!!
A hospital scene with loads of doctors and nurses in white coats and masks fiddling with beeping machines is just that – DRAMA! Filming a mum quietly giving birth at home by candle light with her husband holding her hand, and a midwife knitting in the corner is not exactly dramatic material. And yet, that was pretty much what one of my births was like. The other one wasn’t that dissimilarexcept the midwife wasn’t knitting.

School We’ve all been there girls! Sat at school being made to watch THE VIDEO. You know, that hugely dramatic childbirth one… the one with the screaming woman, blood everywhere, hospital scene the one that was etched into your brain that put you off kids for life.. yeah.. that one! Now I can ‘t help wondering whether the objective for schools “educating” teenage girls about childbirth, is probably going to have prevent teenage pregnancies higher on the list than educate/demonstrate how childbirth CAN BE. Well, it worked for me anyhow… the idea of kids pushed firmly to the back on my to-do list.


Friends & Family We might be lucky and hear positive tales, but generally we’ll probably only hear to the horror stories… the positive stories don’t seem to surface. In fact, I’m speaking to a lot of mums right now who have had positive birth stories and one thing keeps coming up; they don’t often get to share their story. It seems that when it transpires that they had a great birth, that other women are not interested in hearing their story. Or if they do get a chance to start sharing, they aren’t well received so they keep it brief and then decide not to share next time, or they play it down. Some have even been cut-down while sharing their stories, while others are accused of gloating. Like, seriously! And all this FROM OTHER WOMEN! And so all we’re left with are tales of pain, trauma, drama and “NEVER AGAIN!”… how tragic.
Where does all this lead us to believe (WRONGLY!) about childbirth? Well, the short answer is this: we’re being drip fed a ton of lies about childbirth! Of course, it’s not an intentional thing, it’s just where we find ourselves. Through the various sources of information that we are typically exposed to that help inform us on childbirth, it can be fairly safe to say that the overall picture is not a pretty one. There are some consistent lies about childbirth that we’re being fed and they are coming right up…

The 3 lies about childbirth that won’t go away

Lie #1: Labour and childbirth WILL be painful This seems to be a given, and non negotiable fact. WRONG! There are many women who give birth and don’t find it painful.. Just search this blog for positive birth stories to find other women’s accounts of their positive pain-free births if you like (I’ll be adding more to this as time goes on). There are many cultures where pain isn’t automatically assumed to accompany childbirth, it’s mainly a western thing. And let’s not forget, animals aren’t in pain when they give birth either and that’s because they’re not full of fear, as we are BECAUSE OF THESE LIES ABOUT CHILDBIRTH!

Lie #2: Childbirth is a medical situation This is why most babies are only born in hospitals, right? WRONG! Pregnant women are not ill. They are not suffering from a medical condition that requires medical attention. Unless they are suffering from a medical condition that would still require medical supervision were they not pregnant.

Lie #3: Childbirth requires medical assistance Childbirth needs an army of nurses and doctors to be present as well as some scary-looking medical machines and instruments. And the woman giving birth is going to need a whole host of medical aids – drugs, artificial oxytocin, epidural injections, forceps etc because she just can’t do it on her own. AGAIN – WRONG! Women are perfectly capable of giving birth unassisted by these artificial and medical interventions. If there’s any help and support the woman needs, it’s emotional support to help her feel safe, secure and loved… it’s this that keeps labour progressing naturally at a pace that she and baby can handle. The minute we mess with that, we disrupt nature’s ability to just get on with it and do what it knows so well. What is so sad about all of this is that as women we are conditioned since our school days that childbirth is not something we can do on our own, but that we need help with it. Medical help. On the one hand, our biology lessons taught us that women are built to conceive and give birth to ensure the survival of our race. And yet, popular culture bombards us with messages that lead us to believe that actually, we’re not really capable of doing what our bodies were built to do. In fact, we’re just not good enough. We’re failures! But there’s a double whammy here. The more we are led to believe that childbirth requires medical assistance, theless likely we are to believe that it’s a natural process that can happen perfectly adequately on its own. Now of course, there are still risks, as with most things in life and sure, childbirth carries with it some risks. Risks that are increased if the health of the mother is compromised, or if she doesn’t have access to adequate healthcare. So in developing countries, childbirth brings with it a more increased risk to life than it does for those of us living in developed countries. But driving a car is risky, and so is walking
on a pavement.. and yet we are not constantly being bombarded with stories of car accidents and pedestrians being hit by drunk drivers or out of control vehicles. So let’s set the record straight here. Let’s bust these lies about childbirth once and for all!

 Childbirth truths to be embraced Let’s embrace these truths instead:

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "happy pregnancy"Truth #1: Childbirth doesn’t have to hurt… In fact if you surrender to the process and let nature do her thing it won’t. but that means letting go.. so those of you with control issues might find that a tad tricky! 
Truth #2: Childbirth is not an illness or a medical condition… It does not require doctors or a hospital. It only becomes a medical condition once mum’s health is compromised. But for the most part, it’s a natural process that happens much more safely and with better outcomes at home. 
Truth #3: Childbirth does not require medical assistance… You do not NEED drugs or injections. If you get to that point in labour then it’s more likely to be because you were induced. Induction often leads to a cascade cascade of interventions which might well include an emergency c-section. If you create the space to allow nature to be in control and to set the pace then no medical interventions should be required. Unless of course complications arise, and then, yes is hands off – let the medical teams DO THEIR THING! So, if you’re a parent-to-be, be aware of these lies about childbirth and make sure you get savvy about it so that you are well informed. Don’t rely on your mates or the movies for your education, because it could mean the difference between a positive and negative birth experience and it’s just not worth it.


if you ask any woman who has yet to have a baby what she knows about childbirth you are probably going to hear things like; 
it happens in a hospital
it hurts
you need drugs,
injections, 
doctors, nurses
it can go on for days
it’s dangerous… you can DIE!!

Where do we get this from? When you stop and think about it… we never really get properly educated about childbirth. And yet, it has the potential to affect half of the global population. Instead of there being a conscious effort to educate women about childbirth, we are left to our own devices to absorb whatever happens to be passing in the wind. And this usually means that our main sources of information are places like:

TV shows & movies They want DRAMA!!!!!
A hospital scene with loads of doctors and nurses in white coats and masks fiddling with beeping machines is just that – DRAMA! Filming a mum quietly giving birth at home by candle light with her husband holding her hand, and a midwife knitting in the corner is not exactly dramatic material. And yet, that was pretty much what one of my births was like. The other one wasn’t that dissimilarexcept the midwife wasn’t knitting.

School We’ve all been there girls! Sat at school being made to watch THE VIDEO. You know, that hugely dramatic childbirth one… the one with the screaming woman, blood everywhere, hospital scene the one that was etched into your brain that put you off kids for life.. yeah.. that one! Now I can ‘t help wondering whether the objective for schools “educating” teenage girls about childbirth, is probably going to have prevent teenage pregnancies higher on the list than educate/demonstrate how childbirth CAN BE. Well, it worked for me anyhow… the idea of kids pushed firmly to the back on my to-do list.


Friends & Family We might be lucky and hear positive tales, but generally we’ll probably only hear to the horror stories… the positive stories don’t seem to surface. In fact, I’m speaking to a lot of mums right now who have had positive birth stories and one thing keeps coming up; they don’t often get to share their story. It seems that when it transpires that they had a great birth, that other women are not interested in hearing their story. Or if they do get a chance to start sharing, they aren’t well received so they keep it brief and then decide not to share next time, or they play it down. Some have even been cut-down while sharing their stories, while others are accused of gloating. Like, seriously! And all this FROM OTHER WOMEN! And so all we’re left with are tales of pain, trauma, drama and “NEVER AGAIN!”… how tragic.
Where does all this lead us to believe (WRONGLY!) about childbirth? Well, the short answer is this: we’re being drip fed a ton of lies about childbirth! Of course, it’s not an intentional thing, it’s just where we find ourselves. Through the various sources of information that we are typically exposed to that help inform us on childbirth, it can be fairly safe to say that the overall picture is not a pretty one. There are some consistent lies about childbirth that we’re being fed and they are coming right up…

The 3 lies about childbirth that won’t go away

Lie #1: Labour and childbirth WILL be painful This seems to be a given, and non negotiable fact. WRONG! There are many women who give birth and don’t find it painful.. Just search this blog for positive birth stories to find other women’s accounts of their positive pain-free births if you like (I’ll be adding more to this as time goes on). There are many cultures where pain isn’t automatically assumed to accompany childbirth, it’s mainly a western thing. And let’s not forget, animals aren’t in pain when they give birth either and that’s because they’re not full of fear, as we are BECAUSE OF THESE LIES ABOUT CHILDBIRTH!

Lie #2: Childbirth is a medical situation This is why most babies are only born in hospitals, right? WRONG! Pregnant women are not ill. They are not suffering from a medical condition that requires medical attention. Unless they are suffering from a medical condition that would still require medical supervision were they not pregnant.

Lie #3: Childbirth requires medical assistance Childbirth needs an army of nurses and doctors to be present as well as some scary-looking medical machines and instruments. And the woman giving birth is going to need a whole host of medical aids – drugs, artificial oxytocin, epidural injections, forceps etc because she just can’t do it on her own. AGAIN – WRONG! Women are perfectly capable of giving birth unassisted by these artificial and medical interventions. If there’s any help and support the woman needs, it’s emotional support to help her feel safe, secure and loved… it’s this that keeps labour progressing naturally at a pace that she and baby can handle. The minute we mess with that, we disrupt nature’s ability to just get on with it and do what it knows so well. What is so sad about all of this is that as women we are conditioned since our school days that childbirth is not something we can do on our own, but that we need help with it. Medical help. On the one hand, our biology lessons taught us that women are built to conceive and give birth to ensure the survival of our race. And yet, popular culture bombards us with messages that lead us to believe that actually, we’re not really capable of doing what our bodies were built to do. In fact, we’re just not good enough. We’re failures! But there’s a double whammy here. The more we are led to believe that childbirth requires medical assistance, theless likely we are to believe that it’s a natural process that can happen perfectly adequately on its own. Now of course, there are still risks, as with most things in life and sure, childbirth carries with it some risks. Risks that are increased if the health of the mother is compromised, or if she doesn’t have access to adequate healthcare. So in developing countries, childbirth brings with it a more increased risk to life than it does for those of us living in developed countries. But driving a car is risky, and so is walking
on a pavement.. and yet we are not constantly being bombarded with stories of car accidents and pedestrians being hit by drunk drivers or out of control vehicles. So let’s set the record straight here. Let’s bust these lies about childbirth once and for all!

 Childbirth truths to be embraced Let’s embrace these truths instead:

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "happy pregnancy"Truth #1: Childbirth doesn’t have to hurt… In fact if you surrender to the process and let nature do her thing it won’t. but that means letting go.. so those of you with control issues might find that a tad tricky! 
Truth #2: Childbirth is not an illness or a medical condition… It does not require doctors or a hospital. It only becomes a medical condition once mum’s health is compromised. But for the most part, it’s a natural process that happens much more safely and with better outcomes at home. 
Truth #3: Childbirth does not require medical assistance… You do not NEED drugs or injections. If you get to that point in labour then it’s more likely to be because you were induced. Induction often leads to a cascade cascade of interventions which might well include an emergency c-section. If you create the space to allow nature to be in control and to set the pace then no medical interventions should be required. Unless of course complications arise, and then, yes is hands off – let the medical teams DO THEIR THING! So, if you’re a parent-to-be, be aware of these lies about childbirth and make sure you get savvy about it so that you are well informed. Don’t rely on your mates or the movies for your education, because it could mean the difference between a positive and negative birth experience and it’s just not worth it.

jeudi 18 octobre 2018

Should Pregnant Women Get The Flu Shot?

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  recommend that every single person six months and older get the influenza vaccine every single year (barring those who are allergic to the flu shot itself, of course).

But here's the thing: What if you're pregnant? Children under six months shouldn't get a flu shot, per the CDC—so...is it safe for moms with babies growing in their uteri to get the prick?

Well, should I get the flu shot when I'm pregnant or not?
Short answer: The CDC says yes, please get your flu shot.

In fact, due to changes in the immune system, heart, and lungs during pregnancy, you might actually be at greater risk of complications from the flu (including hospitalization), so it’s a good idea to get vaccinated so you can avoid that risk.

Plus, by getting the flu vaccine, you also protect your baby as soon as it’s born, as the antibodies get passed in vitro (also important since babies themselves can't get the shots), according to the CDC.

Wait, so it's actually more important for pregnant moms to get a flu shot?
In a word, yes—and not just because it can keep moms from getting the flu (or at least lessen the symptoms if they do).

RELATED STORY
Egg with clock hands in egg carton
Real Talk: Is There A 'Right' Age To Have A Baby?
Fever is one of the most common symptoms of the flu—and in pregnant women, a high internal body temperature can lead to defects in an infant's neural tubes (the structure from which the brain and spinal cord form, per the U.S. National Library of Medicine), which could harm the baby, per the CDC.

“It’s strongly recommended that women get the flu shot,” confirms Rachel Urrutia, M.D., assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “The flu can be more severe for pregnant women, compared to other times in a woman’s life. Their immune system is less strong, and the airways involved in breathing are more swollen, so this can make the flu more serious," she says.

Okay, but are there any extra precautions pregnant women should take?
Yep—the CDC, along with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), suggests getting the actual flu shot, not the nasal spray.

“The nasal spray contains a live virus,” says Urrutia. “We don’t recommend any vaccines with a live virus for pregnant women," she says. That's not necessarily because the spray will cause the flu, but because pregnant women's immune systems are already lowered, so the active virus could potentially cause a slight fever.

RELATED STORY
flu shot side effects
7 Flu Shot Side Effects You Should Know About
Keep in mind, however, that some people might still get a low-grade fever (below 100) and feel slightly tired or achey even after the shot, says Urrutia, and that’s normal. “Your body is creating an immune response to the vaccine,” she says. If your fever goes above 100, or you get other symptoms like chest pain or shortness of breath, then get a medical appointment, ASAP.

But from there, the precautions pregnant women should take are just like the precautions anyone else should heed—which means not getting the flu shot if you're allergic to it or if you're ill with a fever (just wait 'til you feel better in that case).

In addition to the shot, pregnant women should take the typical precautions for sidestepping the flu. That includes your regular germ-avoiding tactics, like washing your hands, covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, and staying away from other sick people, says Urrutia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  recommend that every single person six months and older get the influenza vaccine every single year (barring those who are allergic to the flu shot itself, of course).

But here's the thing: What if you're pregnant? Children under six months shouldn't get a flu shot, per the CDC—so...is it safe for moms with babies growing in their uteri to get the prick?

Well, should I get the flu shot when I'm pregnant or not?
Short answer: The CDC says yes, please get your flu shot.

In fact, due to changes in the immune system, heart, and lungs during pregnancy, you might actually be at greater risk of complications from the flu (including hospitalization), so it’s a good idea to get vaccinated so you can avoid that risk.

Plus, by getting the flu vaccine, you also protect your baby as soon as it’s born, as the antibodies get passed in vitro (also important since babies themselves can't get the shots), according to the CDC.

Wait, so it's actually more important for pregnant moms to get a flu shot?
In a word, yes—and not just because it can keep moms from getting the flu (or at least lessen the symptoms if they do).

RELATED STORY
Egg with clock hands in egg carton
Real Talk: Is There A 'Right' Age To Have A Baby?
Fever is one of the most common symptoms of the flu—and in pregnant women, a high internal body temperature can lead to defects in an infant's neural tubes (the structure from which the brain and spinal cord form, per the U.S. National Library of Medicine), which could harm the baby, per the CDC.

“It’s strongly recommended that women get the flu shot,” confirms Rachel Urrutia, M.D., assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “The flu can be more severe for pregnant women, compared to other times in a woman’s life. Their immune system is less strong, and the airways involved in breathing are more swollen, so this can make the flu more serious," she says.

Okay, but are there any extra precautions pregnant women should take?
Yep—the CDC, along with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), suggests getting the actual flu shot, not the nasal spray.

“The nasal spray contains a live virus,” says Urrutia. “We don’t recommend any vaccines with a live virus for pregnant women," she says. That's not necessarily because the spray will cause the flu, but because pregnant women's immune systems are already lowered, so the active virus could potentially cause a slight fever.

RELATED STORY
flu shot side effects
7 Flu Shot Side Effects You Should Know About
Keep in mind, however, that some people might still get a low-grade fever (below 100) and feel slightly tired or achey even after the shot, says Urrutia, and that’s normal. “Your body is creating an immune response to the vaccine,” she says. If your fever goes above 100, or you get other symptoms like chest pain or shortness of breath, then get a medical appointment, ASAP.

But from there, the precautions pregnant women should take are just like the precautions anyone else should heed—which means not getting the flu shot if you're allergic to it or if you're ill with a fever (just wait 'til you feel better in that case).

In addition to the shot, pregnant women should take the typical precautions for sidestepping the flu. That includes your regular germ-avoiding tactics, like washing your hands, covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, and staying away from other sick people, says Urrutia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  recommend that every single person six months and older get the influenza vaccine every single year (barring those who are allergic to the flu shot itself, of course).

But here's the thing: What if you're pregnant? Children under six months shouldn't get a flu shot, per the CDC—so...is it safe for moms with babies growing in their uteri to get the prick?

Well, should I get the flu shot when I'm pregnant or not?
Short answer: The CDC says yes, please get your flu shot.

In fact, due to changes in the immune system, heart, and lungs during pregnancy, you might actually be at greater risk of complications from the flu (including hospitalization), so it’s a good idea to get vaccinated so you can avoid that risk.

Plus, by getting the flu vaccine, you also protect your baby as soon as it’s born, as the antibodies get passed in vitro (also important since babies themselves can't get the shots), according to the CDC.

Wait, so it's actually more important for pregnant moms to get a flu shot?
In a word, yes—and not just because it can keep moms from getting the flu (or at least lessen the symptoms if they do).

RELATED STORY
Egg with clock hands in egg carton
Real Talk: Is There A 'Right' Age To Have A Baby?
Fever is one of the most common symptoms of the flu—and in pregnant women, a high internal body temperature can lead to defects in an infant's neural tubes (the structure from which the brain and spinal cord form, per the U.S. National Library of Medicine), which could harm the baby, per the CDC.

“It’s strongly recommended that women get the flu shot,” confirms Rachel Urrutia, M.D., assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “The flu can be more severe for pregnant women, compared to other times in a woman’s life. Their immune system is less strong, and the airways involved in breathing are more swollen, so this can make the flu more serious," she says.

Okay, but are there any extra precautions pregnant women should take?
Yep—the CDC, along with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), suggests getting the actual flu shot, not the nasal spray.

“The nasal spray contains a live virus,” says Urrutia. “We don’t recommend any vaccines with a live virus for pregnant women," she says. That's not necessarily because the spray will cause the flu, but because pregnant women's immune systems are already lowered, so the active virus could potentially cause a slight fever.

RELATED STORY
flu shot side effects
7 Flu Shot Side Effects You Should Know About
Keep in mind, however, that some people might still get a low-grade fever (below 100) and feel slightly tired or achey even after the shot, says Urrutia, and that’s normal. “Your body is creating an immune response to the vaccine,” she says. If your fever goes above 100, or you get other symptoms like chest pain or shortness of breath, then get a medical appointment, ASAP.

But from there, the precautions pregnant women should take are just like the precautions anyone else should heed—which means not getting the flu shot if you're allergic to it or if you're ill with a fever (just wait 'til you feel better in that case).

In addition to the shot, pregnant women should take the typical precautions for sidestepping the flu. That includes your regular germ-avoiding tactics, like washing your hands, covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, and staying away from other sick people, says Urrutia.

Black Moms More Likely to Die From Pregnancy-Related Ills ??

Unknown
Black womens who have just given birth in Illinois are more likely to die from pregnancy-related issues within a year than non-Hispanic white women a new study finds.

The Illinois Department of Public Health on Thursday released a study of statewide trends in maternal deaths.

The study analyzed the cases of 94 women who died in 2015 while pregnant or within one year of pregnancy. Researchers found an average of 73 Illinois women die within one year of pregnancy. They also found black women are six times as likely to die of a pregnancy-related condition as white women.

Researchers also found that 72% of the pregnancy-related deaths and 93% of violent pregnancy-associated deaths could have been prevented. Obesity contributed to 44% of pregnancy-related deaths in Illinois in 2015.

The department recommends expanding Medicaid eligibility for the postpartum period from 60 days to one year after delivery, among other remedies.
Black womens who have just given birth in Illinois are more likely to die from pregnancy-related issues within a year than non-Hispanic white women a new study finds.

The Illinois Department of Public Health on Thursday released a study of statewide trends in maternal deaths.

The study analyzed the cases of 94 women who died in 2015 while pregnant or within one year of pregnancy. Researchers found an average of 73 Illinois women die within one year of pregnancy. They also found black women are six times as likely to die of a pregnancy-related condition as white women.

Researchers also found that 72% of the pregnancy-related deaths and 93% of violent pregnancy-associated deaths could have been prevented. Obesity contributed to 44% of pregnancy-related deaths in Illinois in 2015.

The department recommends expanding Medicaid eligibility for the postpartum period from 60 days to one year after delivery, among other remedies.
Black womens who have just given birth in Illinois are more likely to die from pregnancy-related issues within a year than non-Hispanic white women a new study finds.

The Illinois Department of Public Health on Thursday released a study of statewide trends in maternal deaths.

The study analyzed the cases of 94 women who died in 2015 while pregnant or within one year of pregnancy. Researchers found an average of 73 Illinois women die within one year of pregnancy. They also found black women are six times as likely to die of a pregnancy-related condition as white women.

Researchers also found that 72% of the pregnancy-related deaths and 93% of violent pregnancy-associated deaths could have been prevented. Obesity contributed to 44% of pregnancy-related deaths in Illinois in 2015.

The department recommends expanding Medicaid eligibility for the postpartum period from 60 days to one year after delivery, among other remedies.

The Conscious Pregnancy Program

Pregnancy Ladies
When I was pregnant with my daughter, Madhur Nain, I started to comb through Yogi Bhajan’s teachings for pregnancy and motherhood. In 1982, I began to teach Kundalini Yoga for pregnant women in Amsterdam and later in Hamburg, Germany. In the following years I received many requests from Kundalini Yoga instructors throughout Europe who were interested in serving pregnant women with the yogic teachings. From these requests I created a program in which to share this wealth of information, knowledge and wisdom.

My first pregnancy yoga teacher’s training program began in Hamburg, Germany a few years later. Gradually a professional team of European Kundalini Yoga teachers branched out to train pregnancy yoga teachers, serve pregnant women, new mothers and families.

In 2001 Yogi Bhajan asked Tarn Taran Singh and I to relocate to the United States and expand our efforts to the global family of 3HO. Within a short time the Conscious Pregnancy Training Program expanded around the planet, reaching Australia, Austria, Sweden, Mexico and other countries. Today there are thousands of Conscious Pregnancy classes around the globe, inspiring women as they enter the journey of motherhood.

The realm of yogic practical information and wisdom about the childbearing year is very extensive. If you are interested to learn more, please read the Conscious Pregnancy books or participate in a Conscious Pregnancy training for yoga teachers.
When I was pregnant with my daughter, Madhur Nain, I started to comb through Yogi Bhajan’s teachings for pregnancy and motherhood. In 1982, I began to teach Kundalini Yoga for pregnant women in Amsterdam and later in Hamburg, Germany. In the following years I received many requests from Kundalini Yoga instructors throughout Europe who were interested in serving pregnant women with the yogic teachings. From these requests I created a program in which to share this wealth of information, knowledge and wisdom.

My first pregnancy yoga teacher’s training program began in Hamburg, Germany a few years later. Gradually a professional team of European Kundalini Yoga teachers branched out to train pregnancy yoga teachers, serve pregnant women, new mothers and families.

In 2001 Yogi Bhajan asked Tarn Taran Singh and I to relocate to the United States and expand our efforts to the global family of 3HO. Within a short time the Conscious Pregnancy Training Program expanded around the planet, reaching Australia, Austria, Sweden, Mexico and other countries. Today there are thousands of Conscious Pregnancy classes around the globe, inspiring women as they enter the journey of motherhood.

The realm of yogic practical information and wisdom about the childbearing year is very extensive. If you are interested to learn more, please read the Conscious Pregnancy books or participate in a Conscious Pregnancy training for yoga teachers.
When I was pregnant with my daughter, Madhur Nain, I started to comb through Yogi Bhajan’s teachings for pregnancy and motherhood. In 1982, I began to teach Kundalini Yoga for pregnant women in Amsterdam and later in Hamburg, Germany. In the following years I received many requests from Kundalini Yoga instructors throughout Europe who were interested in serving pregnant women with the yogic teachings. From these requests I created a program in which to share this wealth of information, knowledge and wisdom.

My first pregnancy yoga teacher’s training program began in Hamburg, Germany a few years later. Gradually a professional team of European Kundalini Yoga teachers branched out to train pregnancy yoga teachers, serve pregnant women, new mothers and families.

In 2001 Yogi Bhajan asked Tarn Taran Singh and I to relocate to the United States and expand our efforts to the global family of 3HO. Within a short time the Conscious Pregnancy Training Program expanded around the planet, reaching Australia, Austria, Sweden, Mexico and other countries. Today there are thousands of Conscious Pregnancy classes around the globe, inspiring women as they enter the journey of motherhood.

The realm of yogic practical information and wisdom about the childbearing year is very extensive. If you are interested to learn more, please read the Conscious Pregnancy books or participate in a Conscious Pregnancy training for yoga teachers.

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