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mercredi 17 octobre 2018

How to Clear Your Fear of Childbirth and Labour

Pregnancy Ladies


Having a fear of childbirth or labour is pretty common but it needn’t be, because there are now many techniques available to us that can effectively clear fears. Unfortunately most of these require you to visit (and pay) someone who is not only trained in using them, but can use them well.. not always easy, or affordable! So today I’m going to share with you a technique that not only clears fears away super effectively, but that you can use yourself without being trained. The only requirement on your part is to be able to read and then commit to do the work. And given that a fear can be came to childbirth. The mere thought of a birth canal or reading about childbirth in a newspaper would have me in tears.

How to clear your fear of childbirth 
1. Identify your fears
The first step here is to identify your fears. So, have a bit of a brainstorm and jot down all the things that terrify you when it comes to childbirth or labour. Don’t hold back.. even the silly-sounding ones. It really doesn’t matter. The most important thing is that you need to purge them from your mind and body and the first step is to name and shame them.

2. Talk it out:
Don’t be afraid to ask questions and talk about what’s bothering you. Hammer suggests speaking with someone—a partner, friend, doctor, doula or therapist—about your feelings as soon as something comes up, no matter how insignificant you think it might be. Expressing your thoughts can help you understand them, which will give you insight into how to cope. And while it may be tempting to avoid thinking about labour, ignoring your worries can make the fear grow, Hammer says. In some cases, it can also affect your mental health during pregnancy. “If fear is not addressed, it can manifest as depression or anxiety,” she explains.

Just be careful about who you confide in, cautions certified birth doula Kelly Carrington. “Get quality advice from level-headed people,” he advises. Friends and family often like to share birth horror stories, but it’s more helpful to hear positive ones, he explains. Talk to professionals who see birth as a normal process and won’t scare you with worst-case scenarios.

3. Fill your tool box:
If pain is your big fear, then make sure you know what options are available in terms of pain management. Just knowing you have tools at hand may ease your worries. Varying birth positions may make labour go more smoothly, says Carrington. One trick: Start training your brain to think of contractions as sensations that will help you deliver your baby, and learn how to breathe and relax into them instead of fighting them, says Hammer. (Prenatal yoga and meditation classes can work wonders with this.)

4. Break it down: 
While it’s a good idea to be prepared, try not to focus all of your energy on thoughts about the delivery. “When I talk to families, I split everything up: what happens before the birth day, on the birth day and then everything that happens after,” explains Carrington. “If you compartmentalize it, you can deal with each section instead of looking at birth as this huge monster.”

5. Go team:
Robertson was fortunately taken under the wing of her pastor’s mother, who guided her through the delivery. “During labour, every time I got scared, I would look at her,” Robertson says. “That’s how I remember getting through it. She did things naturally that I didn’t even think of, like dim the lights and talk, and even pray with me when I got scared.”

As Robertson learned, picking the right people to be with you can help reassure you. A strong ally, like a doula or your partner, can advocate for you, especially if you go in with a birth plan that everybody is comfortable with. “Sometimes the fear is about having your power taken away,” says Hammer. “That does happen in some cases


Having a fear of childbirth or labour is pretty common but it needn’t be, because there are now many techniques available to us that can effectively clear fears. Unfortunately most of these require you to visit (and pay) someone who is not only trained in using them, but can use them well.. not always easy, or affordable! So today I’m going to share with you a technique that not only clears fears away super effectively, but that you can use yourself without being trained. The only requirement on your part is to be able to read and then commit to do the work. And given that a fear can be came to childbirth. The mere thought of a birth canal or reading about childbirth in a newspaper would have me in tears.

How to clear your fear of childbirth 
1. Identify your fears
The first step here is to identify your fears. So, have a bit of a brainstorm and jot down all the things that terrify you when it comes to childbirth or labour. Don’t hold back.. even the silly-sounding ones. It really doesn’t matter. The most important thing is that you need to purge them from your mind and body and the first step is to name and shame them.

2. Talk it out:
Don’t be afraid to ask questions and talk about what’s bothering you. Hammer suggests speaking with someone—a partner, friend, doctor, doula or therapist—about your feelings as soon as something comes up, no matter how insignificant you think it might be. Expressing your thoughts can help you understand them, which will give you insight into how to cope. And while it may be tempting to avoid thinking about labour, ignoring your worries can make the fear grow, Hammer says. In some cases, it can also affect your mental health during pregnancy. “If fear is not addressed, it can manifest as depression or anxiety,” she explains.

Just be careful about who you confide in, cautions certified birth doula Kelly Carrington. “Get quality advice from level-headed people,” he advises. Friends and family often like to share birth horror stories, but it’s more helpful to hear positive ones, he explains. Talk to professionals who see birth as a normal process and won’t scare you with worst-case scenarios.

3. Fill your tool box:
If pain is your big fear, then make sure you know what options are available in terms of pain management. Just knowing you have tools at hand may ease your worries. Varying birth positions may make labour go more smoothly, says Carrington. One trick: Start training your brain to think of contractions as sensations that will help you deliver your baby, and learn how to breathe and relax into them instead of fighting them, says Hammer. (Prenatal yoga and meditation classes can work wonders with this.)

4. Break it down: 
While it’s a good idea to be prepared, try not to focus all of your energy on thoughts about the delivery. “When I talk to families, I split everything up: what happens before the birth day, on the birth day and then everything that happens after,” explains Carrington. “If you compartmentalize it, you can deal with each section instead of looking at birth as this huge monster.”

5. Go team:
Robertson was fortunately taken under the wing of her pastor’s mother, who guided her through the delivery. “During labour, every time I got scared, I would look at her,” Robertson says. “That’s how I remember getting through it. She did things naturally that I didn’t even think of, like dim the lights and talk, and even pray with me when I got scared.”

As Robertson learned, picking the right people to be with you can help reassure you. A strong ally, like a doula or your partner, can advocate for you, especially if you go in with a birth plan that everybody is comfortable with. “Sometimes the fear is about having your power taken away,” says Hammer. “That does happen in some cases


Having a fear of childbirth or labour is pretty common but it needn’t be, because there are now many techniques available to us that can effectively clear fears. Unfortunately most of these require you to visit (and pay) someone who is not only trained in using them, but can use them well.. not always easy, or affordable! So today I’m going to share with you a technique that not only clears fears away super effectively, but that you can use yourself without being trained. The only requirement on your part is to be able to read and then commit to do the work. And given that a fear can be came to childbirth. The mere thought of a birth canal or reading about childbirth in a newspaper would have me in tears.

How to clear your fear of childbirth 
1. Identify your fears
The first step here is to identify your fears. So, have a bit of a brainstorm and jot down all the things that terrify you when it comes to childbirth or labour. Don’t hold back.. even the silly-sounding ones. It really doesn’t matter. The most important thing is that you need to purge them from your mind and body and the first step is to name and shame them.

2. Talk it out:
Don’t be afraid to ask questions and talk about what’s bothering you. Hammer suggests speaking with someone—a partner, friend, doctor, doula or therapist—about your feelings as soon as something comes up, no matter how insignificant you think it might be. Expressing your thoughts can help you understand them, which will give you insight into how to cope. And while it may be tempting to avoid thinking about labour, ignoring your worries can make the fear grow, Hammer says. In some cases, it can also affect your mental health during pregnancy. “If fear is not addressed, it can manifest as depression or anxiety,” she explains.

Just be careful about who you confide in, cautions certified birth doula Kelly Carrington. “Get quality advice from level-headed people,” he advises. Friends and family often like to share birth horror stories, but it’s more helpful to hear positive ones, he explains. Talk to professionals who see birth as a normal process and won’t scare you with worst-case scenarios.

3. Fill your tool box:
If pain is your big fear, then make sure you know what options are available in terms of pain management. Just knowing you have tools at hand may ease your worries. Varying birth positions may make labour go more smoothly, says Carrington. One trick: Start training your brain to think of contractions as sensations that will help you deliver your baby, and learn how to breathe and relax into them instead of fighting them, says Hammer. (Prenatal yoga and meditation classes can work wonders with this.)

4. Break it down: 
While it’s a good idea to be prepared, try not to focus all of your energy on thoughts about the delivery. “When I talk to families, I split everything up: what happens before the birth day, on the birth day and then everything that happens after,” explains Carrington. “If you compartmentalize it, you can deal with each section instead of looking at birth as this huge monster.”

5. Go team:
Robertson was fortunately taken under the wing of her pastor’s mother, who guided her through the delivery. “During labour, every time I got scared, I would look at her,” Robertson says. “That’s how I remember getting through it. She did things naturally that I didn’t even think of, like dim the lights and talk, and even pray with me when I got scared.”

As Robertson learned, picking the right people to be with you can help reassure you. A strong ally, like a doula or your partner, can advocate for you, especially if you go in with a birth plan that everybody is comfortable with. “Sometimes the fear is about having your power taken away,” says Hammer. “That does happen in some cases

Pregnancy Ladies / Author & Editor

Stress-Free Pregnancy and a Fear-Free Childbirth

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